Dec 202011
 

The deepest impact on my side was studying the following books during the last year: Continuous Integration by Paul M. Duvall, Steve Matyas and Andrew Glover and Continuous Delivery by Jez Humble and David Farley. These books and presentations during the OOP 2011 in Munique pushed me into the direction that I am trying to describe below.

Before I go into details how we use Cucumber, I want to describe a little bit our environment: In our company we are developing a medical application that can run as a standalone application or in a client / server setup. Each configuration consists for the user of three UI processes and about fifteen background processes or services. The data persistence is realized with a PostgreSQL database, which is handled through one of the service processes. It is a radiological reviewing workstation that is highly optimized on high volume throughput. The image data for each patient can easily be about 2.5 GB and the technical challenge is to display any of next possible radiological images, which can have easily 26-50MB each in less than a second, because our customers are used to diagnose about 60-120 cases per hour. Depending of the current workflow step, the user has to work with a different UI process.

The application has about 2,000,000 lines of C++ code, currently about 10.000 single requirements and most of the functional tests are manual paper based or steered by our test management system SpiraTest. So it is obvious that we have plenty of work to do. Beside the fact that we have way too much requirements or be more precise that the granularity of the requirements is too fine, certain parts of the code are hardly testable in an automated way. Our transition from the V-model to SCRUM two years ago brought up dramatically the fact that test automation is one important step for us to stay productive and ensure quality.

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